OUR WORK—AND WHY IT MATTERS SO VERY MUCH.

 
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We save land that sustains our communities.

what we do:

A 501(c)(3) nonprofit established in 2002, we’re the only nonprofit dedicated to saving the open spaces of Park City and Summit County. We protect and monitor this community’s investment in local open spaces by defending 38 permanent conservation easements on 5,766 acres of land—and we’re currently working to preserve an additional 5,000+ acres of the landscapes our community cherishes.

why we do it:

People come here to work, live, vacation, recreate, and be inspired. They want to be here because of our incredible forests, trails, meadows, mountain slopes, rivers, lakes, and wetlands.

And yet, without our efforts, most of these places are vulnerable to developers. Unlike other Western resort areas surrounded by public lands, our communities are surrounded by private property that is susceptible to development. That’s where we step in—collaborating, negotiating, fundraising, and problem-solving to preserve the places that make Summit County and it’s surrounding areas so special.

We depend on this open land for our lifestyle, our recreation, our food sourcing, and even our drinking water—in fact, the Weber River basin supplies irrigation and drinking water for 30 percent of the Wasatch Front. The farmland we help preserve serves to filter, absorb, and store the seasonal water runoff— keeping it clean while mitigating flooding too.

We’re all stakeholders, and someone has to take the helm. We’re proud to do it—backed by the support of our entire community.

Spaces all Summit County residents depend on.

this work does more than support a lifestyle.
it fuels an economy.

Our tourism, recreation, and resort economy depends on open spaces remaining intact. By preserving undeveloped spaces in Summit County, we keep the scenic views and recreational opportunities that bring so much revenue to our community.

We also support Summit County’s rural economy by preserving working farms and ranches, thus enabling landowners to keep their properties in agriculture, maintain a traditional way of life and protect their heritage for future generations. .

By protecting open lands, we increase property values while avoiding the cost of building expensive subdivisions and the infrastructure they require.

 

Measurable impact. Immeasurable importance.

5,766 acres

of open land protected,
and thousands more to go

1,055 metric tons

of CO2 emissions avoided annually by preserving forested land

600,000 residents’

drinking water sourced from our own Weber Basin


 

Current efforts:

We work year-round to collaborate with local landowner families to protect as many open spaces as possible from development. Because of the sensitive nature of real estate transactions, we can’t talk about every project—but heres a feature we’re excited about.

Photo: Caitlin Willard

Photo: Caitlin Willard

Osguthorpe Farm

This multi-generational family farm is the last agricultural property on Old Ranch Road. It’s designated as a “Heritage Amenity” in the Snyderville Basin General Plan and is considered a critical, high priority preservation property. 

Acres: 158
Location: North side of Old Ranch Road, Snyderville Basin
Owners: Osguthorpe family, Red Pine Livestock
Vegetation: Alfalfa and oats
Wildlife: Mule deer, moose, elk, wild turkey, goshawk, red-tailed hawk, other various raptors, skunk, rabbit, red fox, and others
Conservation Values: Agricultural, open space, and historical

Photo: Bill White Farms

Photo: Bill White Farms

Bill White Farms

Just upstream from the Pyper Tracey Ranch property, this farm is visible from I-84. The Weber River and Franklin Creek run through the farm.

Acres: 302
Location: Pasture along the Weber River and upland hillside in Henefer
Owners: The White family
Wildlife: Elk, trout, bald eagles, sandhill cranes, and sage grouse habitat

 

 

Properties we’ve protected:

To date, we have preserved over 5,766 acres of land—that’s the equivalent of 4,368 football fields, including both end zones! And your contributions make it all possible. We protect your investments to save local open space by monitoring and defending 38 permanent conservation easements throughout Summit County. Zoom in on the map below to have a look at our protected places:

 
 

Stephen’s Ranch
Acres: 44
Location: Henefer
Protected: 2019

Anonymous
Acres: 82
Location: Wanship
Protected: 2018

Rocky Point
Acres: 236
Location: Wanship
Protected: 2018

Rolling Stone Ranch
Acres: 126
Location: Woodland
Protected: 2018

Kings Crown
Acres: 11
Location: Park City
Protected: 2018

Steven’s Grove
Acres: 23
Location: Oakley
Protected: 2018

Ercanbrack Ranch
Acres: 2,161
Location: near Coalville
Protected: 2017

Library Field
Acres: 2
Location: Park City
Protected: 2017

Millrace House
Acres: 3
Location: Oakley
Protected: 2017

Old Ranch Hills
Acres: 60 (made up of 2 separate easements)
Location: Park City
Protected: 2017

Nana B’s Preserve
Acres: 63
Location: Peoa
Protected: 2015

Siddoway Ranch & Wetlands
Acres: 73
Location: Peoa
Protected: 2015

Risner Ridge
Acres: 53
Location: Park City
Protected: 2014

Gambel Oak
Acres: 225
Location: Park City
Protected: 2014

Dog Holler Organic Farm
Acres: 85
Location: near Hoytsville
Protected: 2013

Pyper Tracey Ranch
Acres: 50
Location: Henefer
Protected: 2013

Osguthorpe Ranch
Acres: 121
Location: Park City
Protected: 2012

Miss Billie’s
Acres: 11
Location: Park City
Protected: 2012

Judd Ranch
Acres: 35
Location: Wanship
Protected: 2011

Fawcett Ranch
Acres: 44
Location: Henefer
Protected: 2009 

Quarry Mountain
Acres: 183
Location: Park City
Protected: 2009

Enclave at Cedar Draw
Acres: 64
Location: Park City
Protected: 2006

Virginia Mining Claims
Acres: 13
Location: Park City
Protected: 2005

McPolin Farmlands
Acres: 116
Location: Park City
Protected: 2005

Rail Trail
Acres: 2
Location: Park City
Protected: 2005

Richards Ranch
Acres: 19
Location: Park City
Protected: 2005

Round Valley
Acres: 690 (made up of 5 separate easements)
Location: Park City
Protected: 2005

UP&L
Acres: 0.51
Location: Park City
Protected: 2005

Warren Claims
Acres: 105
Location: Park City
Protected: 2002

Empire Canyon
Acres: 1093 (made up of 4 separate easements)
Location: Park City
Protected: 2002

 

about our
organization

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Our story: saving land, enriching lives.

Since 2002, the Summit Land Conservancy has been preserving priceless landscapes in Park City and Summit County for future generations. We are a strictly local organization, staffed and run by area residents dedicated to saving land.

When we save land, we save everything connected to it: unspoiled views, untouched ski tracks, pristine mountain biking singletrack, blue-ribbon fisheries, artistic inspiration, children’s natural outdoor play areas, clean drinking water, local agriculture, wildlife habitat, and vistas just waiting to be photographed.

Experience our impact every time you walk your dog in Round Valley, admire the elk on Quarry Mountain, ski the aspens in Empire Canyon, fly-fish the Weber river, or stroll by the McPolin farmlands. It’s all been saved for good. For our community. And for you.

 

our mission

Summit Land Conservancy works with our communities to protect and preserve land and water for the benefit of people and nature.

Vision

Open space is the heart of our community. Our sense of place is clearly defined by the shared landscapes that anchor us here. These mountains, trails, farms, and rivers connect us to each other and to the natural world. The Summit Land Conservancy cares for these lands forever, nurturing a healthy community that is founded on its strong connection to the places we’ve protected together.

Values

  • Cooperation:  We collaborate with individuals, organizations, public agencies and communities to identify challenges, devise workable solutions and achieve mutual goals.

  • Organizational Sustainability: We are committed to build and sustain an organization that can provide conservation opportunities and stewardship in perpetuity.

  • Organizational Integrity: We practice sound management. We are honest, effective, efficient, and fiscally responsible.

  • Conservation Leadership: We strive to be a vital, innovative, engaged and utilized provider of conservation services in our communities.

  • Respect:  We base all of our relationships—within our organization, with our conservation partners, our community, and the land itself—on respect, trust, and understanding.

  • Education: We believe in future generations and will focus efforts to insure that adults and children have opportunities to learn respect and appreciation for the natural world.

  • Organizational Character: Natural lands nurture our humanity and our quality of life. We celebrate and relish the way open space makes us smile and laugh and brings us joy and solace. We have fun doing what we do.

 

We’re proud to be accredited by the Land Trust Alliance.

 
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The Land Trust Alliance, based in Washington, D.C., is a national conservation organization that works in three ways to save the places people love: first, they increase the pace of conservation, so more land and natural resources get protected. Second, they enhance the quality of conservation, so the most important lands get protected using the best practices in the business. And third, they ensure the permanence of conservation by creating the laws and resources needed to defend protected land over time.

In 2011, the Summit Land Conservancy became the first land trust in Utah to be accredited by the Land Trust Accreditation Commission. Our accreditation resulted from an extensive, external review process. It means that the Conservancy lives up to the rigorous professional guidelines of the Land Trust Alliance’s Standards and Practices for nonprofit management, conservation transactions and land stewardship.

The accreditation seal recognizes land conservation organizations that meet national standards for excellence, uphold the public trust and ensure that conservation efforts are permanent.

The Land Trust Accreditation Commission awards the seal to community institutions that demonstrate the ability to protect important natural places and working lands forever. The Commission, an independent program of the Land Trust Alliance established in 2006, is governed by a volunteer board of diverse land conservation and nonprofit management experts from around the country. For more information please visit www.landtrustaccreditation.org.

 
 

By the numbers: view our most recent financial reports.

Read up: download our most recent annual report.

Download our most recent financial report and our annual Form 990s.

Each year, we carefully compile an annual report with our latest stats, collaborations, undertakings, and successes! Read the latest and get inspired to save our open spaces.